The Fallacies of Calvinist Apologetics – Fallacy #9: Faith is Some Reason to Boast?

Related fallacies:
Pettifoggery
Category Mistake

A charge typically leveled by Calvinists is that Christians who don’t believe in irresistible grace would have some reason to boast in their faith. John Hendryx concisely expresses this fallacious line of reasoning:

The question we need to be asking ourselves is, “what makes us to differ from other men who do not believe?” … the grace of God in Christ or the will of man? If we say “the will of man” it is a boast and therefore not the kind of faith that is contrasted with works in the Bible. (Hendryx, J., ‘Can Faith Ever Be Considered a Work?’)

We’ll ignore his indirect misapplication of 1 Cor 4:7 for now and focus on his ‘boasting’ claim. To get a clearer picture of the issue, let’s examine what the scriptures tell us:

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith-and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God -not by works, so that no one can boast.” (Eph 2:8-9)

“Where, then, is boasting? It is excluded. On what principle? On that of observing the law? No, but on that of faith.” (Romans 3:27)

The Calvinist assertion is that these scriptures would be violated if we have any choice in whether we believe or not, apparently since someone could theoretically boast about having faith. But can this claim stand up to scrutiny? The hollowness of such a claim can first be shown with one question:

Does the Calvinist view make boasting impossible?

Is it actually impossible for Calvinists to make boasts of any sort? Hardly, I’ve seen it happen quite a few times myself. So holding to a monergistic belief doesn’t forcefully stop one from boasting in any way. What about salvation? Could a Calvinist boast about their role in salvation? I don’t see why they couldn’t. They could either employ inconsistency/cognitive dissonance, or follow through with their doctrine until they reach some strange implications (e.g. “Me being saved glorifies God MORE than any of the non-elect!”). So even a Calvinistic view won’t make boasting utterly impossible, in fact no point of doctrine can stop one from making ridiculous boasts. So scripturally speaking, how is boasting ‘excluded’ then? Since anyone can boast about anything for an invalid reason, Paul obviously isn’t implying that it’s literally impossible to boast if one is saved by faith, he’s saying that salvation through faith leaves one with no valid reason to boast of himself with regards to salvation.

Why does faith preclude boasting?

The answer lies in what we have faith in. ‘Faith’ in context of Paul’s epistles is obviously faith in Christ Jesus as our Lord and the One who saves us from our sins. With regards to salvation, what exactly would one be boasting in if one needs a Savior? As opposed to the law, which could make one righteous if he could keep it (which none but Christ could), faith is rather the acknowledgment that our own righteousness is inadequate, and that we need the righteous Christ as our Savior. There would in fact be no need for a Savior if we could do something that would in and of itself secure forgiveness for our sins! Faith in Jesus Christ and His saving work then effectively is an admission that we have nothing worthy of eternal life, and of ourselves deserve only condemnation.

“What is more, I consider everything a loss compared to the surpassing greatness of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord, for whose sake I have lost all things. I consider them rubbish, that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ-the righteousness that comes from God and is by faith.” (Philippians 3:8-9)

Our believing then constitutes nothing meritorious nor inherently worthy of eternal life -not even as ‘partial payment.’ Faith itself isn’t righteousness, but it’s rather because of God’s graciousness that He has accounted the faith of we who believe as righteousness through Christ despite our undeserving sinfulness and lack of any way to atone for ourselves. Thus the arguments that Calvinists such as Hendryx present betray their fundamental misunderstanding of what faith is, as they attribute to it things it can’t possibly possess by pretending that believing could somehow merit God’s gift of eternal life or be some suitable cause to boast about ourselves because of our acknowledging our total dependence upon the merits of Christ! On the subject of the nature of saving faith, Ben cited an reply by Robert Shank against Berkouwer’s charge that synergistic faith “results in a certain amount of human self conceit”, and “self-esteem.” Shank irreparably shatters the sophist facade:

Conceit and self-esteem for what, Professor Berkouwer? For totally renouncing all claim to self righteousness? For completely repudiating all dependence on good works? For renouncing all claim to personal merit? For abjectly humbling oneself before God as a broken sinner, deserving of death, helpless, unable to save himself? For casting oneself on the mercies of God and hoping only on the merits and grace of Jesus Christ? These are the elements that are of the essence of saving faith, and where true faith exists, there can be no pride or self-esteem. Pride and faith are mutually exclusive. (Shank, R., Elect in the Son, pg. 144)

Whether you freely believe in Christ or not makes a difference only in what you obtain, not what you deserve. But since what you obtain is only what you’ve freely received from God, the One who makes you differ from those with no hope is God, for without His grace and mercy, you’d be no better off than demons who believe. Therefore no flesh can legitimately boast in His sight.

But you did something other people didn’t do!

Much like The Da Vinci Code, the Calvinist argument that Synergists make faith something to boast in looks convincing at first glance, but upon examination, it becomes quite apparent that those who have bought into it have been wholly Dan Browned by its pseudo-logic. Desperate to salvage the polemically effective but badly flawed argument, some have resorted to appeal to comparison: They argue that because believing is something you can say you freely did that other people freely didn’t do (despite being given opportunity), it is therefore something that can be boasted in.

Is there any correctness to this argument? Is my doing something that someone else didn’t do necessarily some cause to boast? Let’s see, Jonas Salk came up with a polio vaccine while his peers didn’t. Could that be grounds for boasting? I suppose it could. But is difference always boastworthy? I wore Nike running shoes today while others wore Keds and ASICS. Does this constitute some reason to brag? Of course not. Simply doing what other people don’t do isn’t in and of itself cause to boast. To argue that one is able to boast about something that one did differently than others, one must necessarily presuppose that what is done differently is something boastworthy. As we’ve established above, faith is in fact not boastworthy for a Christian, and therefore there’s no valid grounds for one who believes to brag about it. Obedience to Christ and His gospel is what God requires of men before He will save them, not something that somehow makes us worthy of His mercy. Jesus Himself clearly communicates this concept:

“So you also, when you have done everything you were told to do, should say, ‘We are unworthy servants; we have only done our duty.'” (Luke 17:10)

So even following the gospel command to believe, we are still the unprofitable servants of a very gracious Lord, and we would be more than foolish to think we could boast in anything but knowing Him.


Bottom Line:

* No belief makes boasting impossible, when the Bible tells us that boasting is excluded, it’s implying that no one has valid grounds to boast.

* Because faith doesn’t earn or merit eternal life but rather only obtains it by God’s grace, believing isn’t a valid reason to boast. Who does or doesn’t freely believe doesn’t alter that fact.

* Because faith in Christ is an acknowledgment of dependence upon Him and His merits rather than our own, to someone who is consistent, faith and boasting are mutually exclusive.

Advertisements

19 Responses

  1. The Calvinist assertion is that these scriptures would be violated if we have any choice in whether we believe or not, apparently since someone could theoretically boast about having faith.

    I am not certain that all boasting is forbidden. Perhaps it is, but I think the Calvinist may be wrong about what these passages excluding boasting of faith. The context seems to me to be talking about salvation in Eph, and righteousness and justification in Rom. Thus because salvation is a work of God, our righteousness comes from God, and it is God who makes us righteous, there is no valid reason to boast of these things.

    But I am not convinced that boasting or not boasting about faith, or for having faith is even addressed here? And presumably one can boast about some things.

    Thus says the LORD: “Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the LORD who practices steadfast love, justice, and righteousness in the earth. For in these things I delight, declares the LORD.” (Jer 9)

  2. …and a Calvinist brother boasted and commented when I posted this on my Facebook. He said Calvinist Christian Rappers are emerging there in the US. hehehe

  3. Here are a few thoughts regarding this fallacy:

    1. Where does the Bible teach that faith can be a work? I have looked at all the verses concerning faith and works and faith is always contrasted with works.

    2. Where does the Bible teach that faith is a gift and what does that even mean? I know the verse in Ephesians is the first one that every Calvinist runs to but I believe when looked at closely and in conjunction with the other relevant passages its clear that the gift is the Salvation that is by grace through faith in Christ not faith itself. If faith was a gift then that means that God believes for us and that can be refuted by many passages in scripture.

    3. Where does the Bible teach that faith is something that we can boast about? As you stated in this post, boasting is excluded on the basis of faith, not the basis of faith being a gift. They dealt with a lot of heresies in their times but I dont remember anything being written to address the “faith can be considered a work – therefore one could boast” heresy.

    4. One thing I hear Calvinists say all the time is that we are “saved by grace” and they always leave faith out. What does the Scripture say? “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith”. The Calvinist would have you believe that you are saved unto faith not saved by faith. This is related to the fallacy that one is born again before one is saved which I believe is a result of being consistent with a theological system and results in gross eisegesis.

    5. The one thing that those who teach this fallacy are missing is that the power of Salvation is not in our faith in and of itself but in the one in whom we are believing in. Paul addressed this perfectly in 1 Cor 15:17 “if Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins.” Wow, so we can have faith and it be worthless if Christ did not resurrect? That should put to rest the foolish notion that faith is something to boast about and instead put of attention to the one that we can boast in all day – our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!!

  4. bethyada, I agree with you about the context, it’s talking about boasting in our own righteousness, esp. as it pertains to salvation.

    rex, that’s pretty funny.

    JPC, excellent observations. I believe faith is a gift in that we can’t believe of ourselves without grace, but it hardly follows that it’s an irresistibly conferred gift. And yes, they consistently miss the “through faith” part. So much so that their strange version of ‘grace alone’ either exclude faith else conflates it with grace. In the monergism article I linked to at the top, Hendryx actually does quote that ‘saved unto faith’ canard, which an inexcusable bungling of scripture’s plain teaching that we’re justified by faith (Rom 3:28, 5:1, Gal 2:16, 3:24 et al).

  5. Hello JC,

    I have said it before and repeat myself again as I want to make sure this “gets through” some extremely thick heads. I do a lot of evangelism and others (whether they be Arminians, Calvinists, Catholics, or whatever) will concur with what I am about to say if (1) they actually evangelize themselves (i.e. are involved in leading others to receive Christ and be saved) and (2) have been saved themselves.

    JC you wrote a subheading followed by some words when you wrote:

    “Why does faith preclude boasting?
    The answer lies in what we have faith in. ‘Faith’ in context of Paul’s epistles is obviously faith in Christ Jesus as our Lord and the One who saves us from our sins. With regards to salvation, what exactly would one be boasting in if one needs a Savior?”

    You are focusing on the object of faith, if the object of faith is the Lord and what He has done then the confidence is placed in the Lord and His work, not what we do. And this is true. But it is not the whole picture. Another equally correct and equally present answer to the question of “Why does faith preclude boating” is this: the **nature** of **saving faith** excludes or precludes boasting.

    When a sinner is shown by the Holy Spirit that he/she has sinned against God, others and has no hope of salvation apart from trusting in Jesus alone to save them. When a sinner is convicted of their own sinfulness by the powerful work of the Spirit. When the Spirit reveals to the sinner who Jesus is, what he has done, that the sinner cannot save himself/herself by their own works or efforts.

    When the Spirit reveals and convicts the sinner in this way, THE SINNER WILL BE HUMBLED.

    He will have the attitude of the person who is contrasted with the prideful Pharisee in Luke 18:9-14. Recall in that passage that the Pharisee who did place his confidence in his own efforts WAS ARROGANT AND BOASTFUL ABOUT IT. In fact the parable opens in v. 9 saying that Jesus directed or spoke the parable to those “who trusted in their own righteousness in themselves, that they were righteous and despised others” (i.e. Pharisees who trusted that their own righteousness would save them!. In contrast the Publican was so humbled by the grace of God that he didn’t even look up! And that is my point, a person who experiences the powerful work of the Spirit will find himself in a place where they literally BEG GOD TO SAVE THEM. That is why I have often called it “begging faith” since I have seen it so many times when people got saved.

    Where they place all of their confidence in God alone to save them.

    In this mental state the sinner is ****humbled**** and their ***mental state is opposite pride***, opposite the boastful Pharisee.

    Look back at your own conversion experience and you will remember being humbled in this way.

    And look at others whom you lead to Christ and you will see the same thing. And if the person never experiences this work of the Spirit, this humbling, this being led to the place where they beg God to save them: then I will go so far as to question their salvation. You just don’t come out of this powerful and individual experience of the work of the Spirit with a prideful and arrogant response.

    So the scripture says faith excludes boasting and our own experience being saved and seeing others get saved also bears out this reality.

    Robert

  6. Robert, you are absolutely right that the nature of saving faith is that of humilty and brokenness as evidenced by the Scriptures: “But to this one I will look, To him who is humble and contrite of spirit, and who trembles at My word.” and again “The LORD is near to the brokenhearted And saves those who are crushed in spirit.” I recall my own conversion experience where I was a sinner apart from Christ and felt the overwhelming burden and filth of my sins before a Holy God and my utter helplesness in being able to save my soul. This was followed by the joy of realizing the good news of the Gospel and the knowledge that Christ died for my sins and would save me if I repented and trusted in him for my salvation. The joy was such that I could not help but speak to others about this great Gospel and to boast in the one – Jesus Christ our Lord – who humbled himself, took the form of a man, lived a perfect life, gave his life in that tortuous death on the cross, rose again on the third day and is seated at the right hand of God. I never once though about boasting in the fact that this wretched sinner who was hopeless and destined for eternal destruction, has been saved by God’s grace through faith which is in Christ Jesus. I only heard of this when I started studying Calvinism and they began teaching this strange doctrine of Faith being considered a work and being something one could boast about. Surely someone who would have the audacity to say “you see God did 99.99 percent of the work but I believed God so I deserve the credit for my Salvation” has not really known God at all.

  7. Robert, your comments on the nature of saving faith reflect the quote by Robert Shank pretty closely (serious kudos to Ben for finding the awesome quote). Also, if you would, let’s please keep the “thick heads” type of comments down.

    JPC, to your last thought, I think it’s vital to differentiate between the condition to salvation and the actual saving work. Coming to faith in Christ freely isn’t 99.99% God saving me and 0.01% me saving me. I do exactly 100% of my own believing in Christ, to which God has graciously responded with doing exactly 100% of the saving work.

  8. Hello JPC,

    “Robert, you are absolutely right that the nature of saving faith is that of humility and brokenness as evidenced by the Scriptures: “But to this one I will look, To him who is humble and contrite of spirit, and who trembles at My word.” and again “The LORD is near to the brokenhearted And saves those who are crushed in spirit.” I recall my own conversion experience where I was a sinner apart from Christ and felt the overwhelming burden and filth of my sins before a Holy God and my utter helplessness in being able to save my soul. This was followed by the joy of realizing the good news of the Gospel and the knowledge that Christ died for my sins and would save me if I repented and trusted in him for my salvation. The joy was such that I could not help but speak to others about this great Gospel and to boast in the one – Jesus Christ our Lord – who humbled himself, took the form of a man, lived a perfect life, gave his life in that tortuous death on the cross, rose again on the third day and is seated at the right hand of God. I never once thought about boasting in the fact that this wretched sinner who was hopeless and destined for eternal destruction, has been saved by God’s grace through faith which is in Christ Jesus.”

    First of all, thanks for sharing that, I am truly blessed to hear testimonies of the grace of God in salvation, like this.

    Second, JPC you absolutely prove my point here. Any true believer knows exactly what I am talking about when I speak of “begging faith” and their experience of the work of the Spirit prior to their own conversion. For myself it is extremely encouraging hearing others testify to having the same exact experience. This is even easy to prove with calvinists themselves. Just ask them to look back at their own conversion experience and they will (if they are truly believers) remember having gone through the same experience.

    That is why I find it really odd and even sometimes disturbing that these same folks who have supposedly had this very experience themselves (who know firsthand that the work of the Spirit humbles sinners in the process of saving them, who know firsthand that when they had saving faith, initial faith, they had a mentality completely opposite of boasting). Can then with a straight face trot out this ridiculous argument that a person who has saving faith and experiences the humbling work of the Spirit and chooses to trust in Christ alone for salvation could be or will be boasting about it.

    I often ask these folks how much experience they have of real evangelism in the real world. Usually they are young Calvinistas who want to argue for calvinism but who have usually never even lead a single soul to Christ for salvation. They are talking lots of **theory** while they have not been involved in the conversion of real sinners in the real world.

    “I only heard of this when I started studying Calvinism and they began teaching this strange doctrine of Faith being considered a work and being something one could boast about. Surely someone who would have the audacity to say “you see God did 99.99 percent of the work but I believed God so I deserve the credit for my Salvation” has not really known God at all.”

    JPC you have to keep in mind that many of these Calvinistas are desperate to in any way argue for calvinism that they will trot out this argument. It is surprising that the bible explicitly states in the book of Romans of all places (you would think that those who strongly believe in justification by faith alone would know what the bible actually says about saving faith and specifically in the book of Romans), that saving faith EXCLUDES BOASTING. If these people really believed and knew their bibles, they would not even make this ridiculous argument.

    But as committed Calvinistas they are so zealous to argue and fight for calvinism that they neglect what the bible actually and EXPLICITLY says about the nature of saving faith.

    Robert

  9. Hello JC,

    “Robert, your comments on the nature of saving faith reflect the quote by Robert Shank pretty closely (serious kudos to Ben for finding the awesome quote). Also, if you would, let’s please keep the “thick heads” type of comments down.”

    That’s because Shank’s quote corresponds with the reality that we observe when people are converted to Christ. It also corresponds well with our own conversion experience.

    Regarding the “thick heads” phrase, I am talking about the stubbornness being exhibited by those who repeatedly make this argument even when repeatedly corrected.

    For those people who engage in real world evangelism (Arminians, calvinists and others) and are involved in leading people to Christ for salvation. We have seen the powerful and unmistakable work of the Holy Spirit and seen how His work completely eliminates pride in those truly converted to Christ. We know and understand the nature of both saving faith and the conversion experience of those converted to Christ. We know that saving faith never leads to arrogance and always involves being truly humbled.

    One has to totally disregard both what scripture says as well as our own conversion experience (and in the case of those making this argument: their very own conversion experience) to make this argument. Some calvinists have been shown the problems with this particular argument and yet they keep making the very same argument over and over. Someone who repeatedly presents this particular argument despite being repeatedly corrected on it, despite the realities of scripture and people’s actual conversion experiences, is “thick headed”/stubborn.

    Robert

  10. JC: ” I believe faith is a gift in that we can’t believe of ourselves without grace, but it hardly follows that it’s an irresistibly conferred gift.”

    JC, then what you are saying is that “prevenient grace” or “the conviction of the Holy Spirit” is a gift and I would agree with that but you cant say that faith is a gift. Faith is an individual placing their trust in Christ for their Salvation so if that is a gift then God is believing for us. For example: “For what saith the scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness.” Rom. 4:3. and “Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar?” James 2:21. So while God called Abraham, he did not believe for him nor did he sacrifice Isaac for him, Abraham is credited in Scripture for that. I dont think that Abraham would have boasted about having faith and living out that faith in obedience which is why we cant boast about our faith as well.

  11. JC: “Coming to faith in Christ freely isn’t 99.99% God saving me and 0.01% me saving me. I do exactly 100% of my own believing in Christ, to which God has graciously responded with doing exactly 100% of the saving work.”

    I agree with this completely and the reason why I made that comment was because I was repeating what I have heard Calvinists accuse Non-Calvinists of frequently.

  12. JPC,

    @then what you are saying is that “prevenient grace” or “the conviction of the Holy Spirit” is a gift and I would agree with that but you cant say that faith is a gift.

    I’m thinking it’s a gift in the sense that it’s granted by God that we can believe, cf:

    “For it has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for him…” (Philippians 1:29)

    “And he said, “This is why I told you that no one can come to me unless it is granted him by the Father.”” (John 6:65)

    Obviously, this wouldn’t amount to God believing for us as you correctly state.

  13. Robert: “JPC you have to keep in mind that many of these Calvinistas are desperate to in any way argue for calvinism that they will trot out this argument.”

    I have been reflecting further on just why anyone would attempt to argue that faith can be considered a work and we can boast if we believe and here is what I think. First of all, I genuinely believe that many Calvinists are sincere in their convictions and want to bring glory to God. What I have noticed among many Calvinists (I have been reading many different authors and listening to many sermons) is that they place a majority of their emphasis on Unconditional election to the point that any action that comes from man detracts from God’s glory in their eyes, including repentance and faith. I have also heard it argued like this: Who is sovereign in salvation – God or Man? As if by placing the responsibility on man to repent and believe would somehow equate to God giving up his Sovereignty. I believe that Faith is only a small piece to the puzzle in their eyes because they believe that if you are Chosen then God will irresistibly give you Faith and repentance as gifts so the focus should not be on Faith but on election. But what does the Scripture say? It is clear that in the New Testament faith is a central issue and spoken of more so than anything else (apart from Jesus Christ of course!). Therefore, if we are to be faithful to the whole testimony of Scripture we should emphasize that as well, even if it results in being falsely accused of “boasting” by our Calvinist brothers.

  14. Hello JPC,

    “I have been reflecting further on just why anyone would attempt to argue that faith can be considered a work and we can boast if we believe and here is what I think. First of all, I genuinely believe that many Calvinists are sincere in their convictions and want to bring glory to God.”

    Sincerity alone does not make something true, many non-Christian cultists are sincere and sincerely wrong!

    “What I have noticed among many Calvinists (I have been reading many different authors and listening to many sermons) is that they place a majority of their emphasis on Unconditional election to the point that any action that comes from man detracts from God’s glory in their eyes, including repentance and faith.”

    That is a big mistake, because in fact some things that are part of the process of salvation do COME FROM MAN. Including faith and repentance. We have to trust, we have to turn away from one thing to do another.

    “I have also heard it argued like this: Who is sovereign in salvation – God or Man? As if by placing the responsibility on man to repent and believe would somehow equate to God giving up his Sovereignty.”

    This is really stupid reasoning, there is no other way to refer to this “thinking.” Allow me to explain why. I say stupid because God is the one who decides the nature of salvation. And if He decides that salvation will involve both man repenting and believing (and He has in fact decided that salvation would be THAT WAY). Then how could man by repenting and believing “equate to God giving up his Sovereignty”???

    If God decides what the rules of the game will be and then you play by the rules of the game that God himself set up, then how is God giving up His sovereignty: when it’s His rules??????

    God is sovereign over salvation in that He decides the nature of salvation. If he then decides that certain elements will include things that people do, then salvation including those elements is BASED UPON THE SOVEREIGNTY OF GOD.

    This is why when discussing with determinists/Calvinistas, you have to make the point that the nature of salvation is ***up to God*** as ***He is sovereign***. The nature of reality is up to God as He is sovereign. If God then decides that salvation will include the actions of men believing and repenting, then that is the way it is, no matter how Calvinistas may feel about it. Also, if God decides that human beings will have free will as ordinarily understood, then that is the way it is, no matter how Calvinistas may feel about it. God decides both the nature of salvation and the nature of reality. And so whatever He decides goes.

    It’s His game and His rules!!!

    “Therefore, if we are to be faithful to the whole testimony of Scripture we should emphasize that as well, even if it results in being falsely accused of “boasting” by our Calvinist brothers.”

    Sad that the Calvinistas driven by their ideology end up attacking other believers, falsely accusing others who belong to God. I don’t think God is too pleased with that.

    Robert

  15. Robert,


    “I have also heard it argued like this: Who is sovereign in salvation – God or Man? As if by placing the responsibility on man to repent and believe would somehow equate to God giving up his Sovereignty.”

    This is really stupid reasoning, there is no other way to refer to this “thinking.” Allow me to explain why. I say stupid because God is the one who decides the nature of salvation. And if He decides that salvation will involve both man repenting and believing (and He has in fact decided that salvation would be THAT WAY). Then how could man by repenting and believing “equate to God giving up his Sovereignty”???

    That’s indeed rather stupid. God sets the rules in is thus sovereign. One might as well phrase it like this:

    ——-
    Question: Will God save whom he wishes?

    Answer: Yes.

    Question: And whom exaclty does God will to save?

    Answer: Those who believe the gospel.

    Therefore, believing (=man’s part) the gospel is what God SOVEREIGNLY DECREED to be the way to salvation.

    Any more questions?
    ——-

  16. Why is boasting excluded? You might as well look here:

    http://combatingcalvinism.blogspot.com/search?q=boasting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: